Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 30

Thread: The True Cost

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    15,279
    Thanks
    358
    Thanked 443 Times in 385 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by BigAl View Post
    I am sure that British farmers are up to the challenge of feeding the country..

    There is no way they can do do that. London on it own uses the equivalent of ALL British agricultural production.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Posts
    1,206
    Thanks
    11
    Thanked 77 Times in 70 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by BigAl View Post
    I am sure that British farmers are up to the challenge of feeding the country. Is it not perhaps the fault of the EU's agricultural policy that favours inefficient French farmers above efficient British farmers and then to compound the problem puts quotas in their way eg milk quota etc. and fines them for over-producing. Take away all of the restrictions and I think we will not starve.
    The UK hasn't been able to feed itself since the second world war. It's not going to start in April. You do realise that tariffs keeps foreign foods out of the UK so that was a big advantage for UK farmers. How come the UK farmers haven't been able to feed the UK people for the past 40 or so yrs. The UK can also trade freely its food product all across the EU, thats a 500m market.

    Now take Ireland, we produce over 150% of what we consume, so if we can do that as part of the EU what stopped the UK.

    I think you can stop blaming the EU or the French for the position the UK finds itself in regard food production.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Posts
    1,206
    Thanks
    11
    Thanked 77 Times in 70 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Patman Post View Post
    You're not accounting for charges and restrictions imposed by the UK or variations in local labour costs and depth of buyers' pockets. For example, of the £31.43 for the 1L of Johnny Walker Red Label, £24.83 (79%) of it would be locally imposed duty and vat...
    Pat there's no point, he'll never get it, it is a commplicated and balanced system.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    7,861
    Thanks
    710
    Thanked 718 Times in 607 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Gerry T View Post
    Pat there's no point, he'll never get it, it is a commplicated and balanced system.
    But,but ain't you bothered,nope.We told people over 5 years ago,this was coming if they didn't listen,then it serves them right.
    17,410,742 people said LEAVE!

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    Southport
    Posts
    1,134
    Thanks
    191
    Thanked 195 Times in 141 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Gerry T View Post
    Pat there's no point, he'll never get it, it is a commplicated and balanced system.
    It’s clearly not as ‘commplicated’ as spelling complicated. Lol
    I can explain it to you, but I canít understand it for you.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    2,214
    Thanks
    33
    Thanked 308 Times in 248 Posts
    The UK hasn't been self sufficient in food production since the 18th century so does it matter?. After all we went through 2 world wars where fleets of U Boats were trying (and failing) to stop us importing food so leaving the EU is gong to be of no consequence to the issue.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Newport, South Wales
    Posts
    9,636
    Thanks
    1,698
    Thanked 1,342 Times in 1,087 Posts
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Gerry T View Post

    Now take Ireland, we produce over 150% of what we consume, so if we can do that as part of the EU what stopped the UK.
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-28003435

    Mainly all these bloody immigrants. If we chucked them out, the pressure to destroy arable land, or use it for "energy" crops, would be somewhat reduced
    --
    "The Inland Revenue is not slow, and quite rightly, to take every advantage which is open to it under the Taxing Statutes for the purposes of depleting the taxpayer's pocket. And the taxpayer is in like manner entitled to be astute to prevent, so far as he honestly can, the depletion of his means by the Inland Revenue"

    Lord Clyde: "Ayrshire Pullman Motor Services V Inland Revenue, 1929"

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Posts
    1,206
    Thanks
    11
    Thanked 77 Times in 70 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by johnofgwent View Post
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-28003435

    Mainly all these bloody immigrants. If we chucked them out, the pressure to destroy arable land, or use it for "energy" crops, would be somewhat reduced
    I presume the immigrants are working, EU immigrants are a net contributor to the EU economy. If you throw them out who will do the work that they do ?

    Rather than targeting immigrants, why not round up all those on benefits, the mentally ill, the people that are unable to work, the old. Chuck all of them out or just stop feeding them. Why target a sector of your economy that is contributing ?

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Posts
    1,206
    Thanks
    11
    Thanked 77 Times in 70 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by El Jefe View Post
    The UK hasn't been self sufficient in food production since the 18th century so does it matter?. After all we went through 2 world wars where fleets of U Boats were trying (and failing) to stop us importing food so leaving the EU is gong to be of no consequence to the issue.
    The only consequence is WTO has high tariffs on food, up to 40%. You'll have no problem getting food, there'll be ques of boats from all around the world willing to sell to you. But expect to see prices rise.
    I suppose the upside is the price increase will be a tax imposed by the UK govt (tariff), so the Govt should have money to invest back into the economy... a modern day robin hood. Take from the masses and give to the needy or lazy

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    2,214
    Thanks
    33
    Thanked 308 Times in 248 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Gerry T View Post
    The only consequence is WTO has high tariffs on food, up to 40%. You'll have no problem getting food, there'll be ques of boats from all around the world willing to sell to you. But expect to see prices rise.
    I suppose the upside is the price increase will be a tax imposed by the UK govt (tariff), so the Govt should have money to invest back into the economy... a modern day robin hood. Take from the masses and give to the needy or lazy
    But the beauty of Brexit is that WE are in charge of those tariffs rates - so at the next election expect to see some politicians arguing for their reduction/removal and then we will see if the people will vote for cheaper food.

    I suspect they will.

Similar Threads

  1. cost of full employment vs cost of welfare state
    By nykk in forum United Kingdom Politics & Political Forum
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 20-10-2011, 02:25 PM
  2. Is it true?
    By Sue in forum Other Countries
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 04-08-2011, 10:09 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •