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Thread: Britain is prepared for a no Brexit deal

  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by scott777 View Post
    No, I agreed farms will make a loss, .
    so my original point stands then?

    added that the rest of us will make a gain.
    well that remains to be seen.
    sing to me the history of my country. It is sweet to the soul to hear it. Flann Mac Lonain ( c.850-918 a.d)
    Alba gu brath An rud is fhiach a ghabhail, 's fhiach e iarraidh

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    74% favour no deal over a bad deal.
    http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/865...n-Brexit-talks

  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by thomas View Post
    You people are taking the absolute piss !

    One of the major arguments in the run up to the scottish indyref , and im sure it was discussed on here , was a sort of "felixstowe effect" for want of a better description , where scottish goods passed though english ports and were counted as ENGLISH trade in the economic war of words at that time.
    Was it?

    To be honest Tommy I did not take a lot of notice of the pros and cons of Scottish independence. And now even Nicola Sturgeon has given up on the idea I am taking even less.

    I suppose that all this proves is that all statistics are suspect and that we shall just have to wait and see. It may be that come Brexit both of us will have to tighten our belts. But I am prepared to accept that so you will have the consolation of knowing that at least one of us is happy.

  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by uganda View Post
    I will leave thomas to give any direct answer to this, but it's interesting you would bring up Holland's reliance on us, because Brexit is going to knock them for six too, leaving a 35million euro black hole in their economy.
    Well, if the Dutch are prepared to to spend £32 billions to punish the UK then one can only admire their resolve. That said, they might be better off making a deal, but I dare say that they feel that their principles are more important than money.

  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry View Post
    74% favour no deal over a bad deal.
    http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/865...n-Brexit-talks
    That poll flys in the face of all the data gathered here in scotland barry.

    For example a recent you gov poll weighted to the recent english general election , over egging the uk support due to reduced scots turnout , found this......


    In hindsight, do you think Britain was right or wrong to vote to leave the European Union?
    30(-1)% Right
    59(+2)% Wrong

    How optimistic or pessimistic are you about how Britain's Brexit negotiations are going?
    16% Optimistic
    72% Pessimistic

    And how optimistic or pessimistic are you about Britain's future after leaving the EU?
    31% Optimistic
    57% Pessimistic

    Once the Brexit negotiations are complete and the terms of Britain's exit from the EU have been agreed, do you think there should or should not be a referendum to accept or reject them?
    46% Should
    33% Should not

    It will be interesting potentially seeing the tories , now polling back in third place as ruthmania dies a death here in scotland , trying to flog the dead horse of a no deal to the scottish electorate.

    In that case we will be perfectly entitled to hold another referendum rejecting this dogs breakfast.
    sing to me the history of my country. It is sweet to the soul to hear it. Flann Mac Lonain ( c.850-918 a.d)
    Alba gu brath An rud is fhiach a ghabhail, 's fhiach e iarraidh

  6. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Borchester View Post
    Was it?

    To be honest Tommy I did not take a lot of notice of the pros and cons of Scottish independence. And now even Nicola Sturgeon has given up on the idea I am taking even less.
    .
    I know borkie , believing that horseshit plucked from the tabloid rags must be helping you sleep better at night.

    I suppose that all this proves is that all statistics are suspect and that we shall just have to wait and see. It may be that come Brexit both of us will have to tighten our belts. But I am prepared to accept that so you will have the consolation of knowing that at least one of us is happy.

    ...but we dont have to accept it.

    Im consoling myself with the fact that as the slow motion brexit car crash gathers pace , at the very least it will give us another go at independence .

    When scots start seeing stories like the latest brexit debacle , where liam fox is rebooting the board of trade , an organisation first set up to regulate colonies and slave plantations back in the days of john of gwents utopian empire , the growing anger against the brexiters empire mark 2 delusion will be off the scale as England attempts to lead scotland off the cliff.


    The Board of Trade is a British government department concerned with commerce and industry, currently within the Department for International Trade.[1] Its full title is The Lords of the Committee of the Privy Council appointed for the consideration of all matters relating to Trade and Foreign Plantations, but is commonly known as the Board of Trade, and formerly known as the Lords of Trade and Plantations or Lords of Trade, is a committee of the Privy Council of the United Kingdom. It was first established as a temporary committee of England's Privy Council to advise on colonial (plantation) questions in the early 17th century, when these settlements were initially forming. The Board would evolve gradually into a government department with considerable power and a diverse range of functions,[2] including regulation of domestic and foreign commerce, the development, implementation and interpretation of the Acts of Trade and Navigation, and the review and acceptance of legislation passed in the colonies. Between 1696 and 1782 the Board of Trade, in partnership with the various[3] secretaries of state over that time, held responsible for colonial affairs, particularly in British America. The Home Secretary held colonial responsibility until 1801 when the Secretary of State for War and the Colonies was established.[4][5]
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Board_of_Trade_(Privy_Council)



    International Trade Secretary Dr Liam Fox convenes a new Board of Trade to ensure the benefits of free trade are spread throughout the UK



    https://www.gov.uk/government/news/i...oughout-the-uk


    sing to me the history of my country. It is sweet to the soul to hear it. Flann Mac Lonain ( c.850-918 a.d)
    Alba gu brath An rud is fhiach a ghabhail, 's fhiach e iarraidh

  7. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by Borchester View Post
    Well, if the Dutch are prepared to to spend £32 billions to punish the UK then one can only admire their resolve. That said, they might be better off making a deal, but I dare say that they feel that their principles are more important than money.
    They are not intending to spend that money to punish anyone, that's just you making things up. Trading with the United Kingdom is likely to be more difficult and more expensive for both countries, with increased costs for materials, components, labour, customs duties, increased tariffs - though some of these could be absorbed by a softer Brexit, hence why the government is desperately trying to negotiate a deal.
    It’s amazing how common this narcissism is: I disagree with person A, and I also disagree with person B, therefore A and B are identical - Daniel Hannan

  8. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by thomas View Post
    That poll flys in the face of all the data gathered here in scotland barry.

    For example a recent you gov poll weighted to the recent english general election , over egging the uk support due to reduced scots turnout , found this......




    It will be interesting potentially seeing the tories , now polling back in third place as ruthmania dies a death here in scotland , trying to flog the dead horse of a no deal to the scottish electorate.

    In that case we will be perfectly entitled to hold another referendum rejecting this dogs breakfast.
    In hindsight, do you think Britain was right or wrong to vote to leave the European Union?30(-1)% Right
    59(+2)% Wrong
    How optimistic or pessimistic are you about how Britain's Brexit negotiations are going?
    16% Optimistic
    72% Pessimistic
    And how optimistic or pessimistic are you about Britain's future after leaving the EU?
    31% Optimistic
    57% Pessimistic
    Once the Brexit negotiations are complete and the terms of Britain's exit from the EU have been agreed, do you think there should or should not be a referendum to accept or reject them?
    46% Should
    33% Should no
    It must be the lack of sunshine in the winter which makes you Scots so pessimistic. I have great optimism for the future of the UK and if I'm deluded, I'm at least happy.
    Borky gets even more sunshine than us in the West Mids, so I expect he's positively dancing.

    Incidentally I see Tusk has told the 27 to prepare for trade talks next week, even though he hasn't extorted his 100 billion Euros yet. They are starting to blink.

  9. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by uganda View Post
    They are not intending to spend that money to punish anyone, that's just you making things up. Trading with the United Kingdom is likely to be more difficult and more expensive for both countries, with increased costs for materials, components, labour, customs duties, increased tariffs - though some of these could be absorbed by a softer Brexit, hence why the government is desperately trying to negotiate a deal.
    The UK is desperately trying to negotiate a deal to save the Dutch £32 billions?

    We are truly a noble nation.

  10. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by Borchester View Post
    The UK is desperately trying to negotiate a deal to save the Dutch £32 billions?

    We are truly a noble nation.
    You know very well that is not what I'm saying, so why are you twisting my words? The United Kingdom is concerned with protecting its own side of any future bargain, but no-one intelligent would want Holland to lose out either, because they are likely to end up poorer and less able to buy our goods.
    It’s amazing how common this narcissism is: I disagree with person A, and I also disagree with person B, therefore A and B are identical - Daniel Hannan

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